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Fire Museum of Greater Cincinnati
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About the Museum

September 11, 2001: A TIMELINE

About Our Building

Learn all about the origins of the building that the Fire Museum of Greater Cincinnati now calls home.

The History of Our Building

In 1906, the building that now houses the Fire Museum of Greater Cincinnati was home to the Engine Company #45 Fire House. Because of this, the Fire Museum of Greater Cincinnati is now included in the National Register of Historic Places.

When Engine Company #45 was decommissioned in 1962, the building in which it was housed became a city storehouse. In 1980, it was given new life as the Fire Museum of Greater Cincinnati.

While Engine Company #45 was still in existence, Cincinnati architect Harry Hake, Sr. (1871 to 1955) was the chief architect for the Cincinnati Fire and Police Departments. When designing the building that is now the Fire Museum of Greater Cincinnati (but was then Engine Company #45), Hake used Renaissance Revival symmetrical design elements and detail (such as cornices, dentils, half columns, and horizontal stone bands) to create two distinct facades: the main elevation that faces Court Street and the other elevation on Richmond Street that faces City Hall.

Hake also designed many other distinctive landmarks (such as the Queen City Club and the Cincinnati Bell building).

There's So Much More History to Share

You can learn much more about the building that houses the Fire Museum of Greater Cincinnati by reading about the museum features.

To see all of this in person, plan a visit to the Fire Museum of Greater Cincinnati today. We can't wait to teach you even more about the history of firefighting!